biological control fire response impact assessment invasive plants mycorrhizal facilitation plant community assembly plant functional types plant nutrition requirements plant taxonomy restoration ecology trophic interactions


Email Ian

+61 8 9168 4200

Facsimile
+61 8 9168 2179
Street Address
Lot 248 Ivanhoe Road, Kununurra WA 6743, Australia
Postal Address
PO Box 942, Kununurra WA 6743, Australia

Profile

Fire ecologist in the Kimberley region. My role is to conduct research to support the implementation of prescribed fire management in the Kimberley region. Research will show the effects on biodiversity, ecosystem function and plant and animal abundance, of current uncontrolled fire regimes compared to areas where controlled prescribed burning has been implemented. The aim is to provide evidence that prescribed burning operations can be used to improve biodiversity status in Kimberley rangelands.

Volunteer field assistant: Fire Ecology of North Australian Mammals, 2013

A volunteer field assistant is needed to help Ian and Richard with a project investigating fire and mammal ecology in the Kimberley, northern Australia. This project relates to recent declines among native mammals across much of northern Australia. Field work will be conducted in the Kimberley region of Western Australia and based out of Kununurra from May to Sep 2013 (specific dates may vary). Volunteers will be involved with trapping, identifying, handling and measuring a range of mammal species from small rodents up to larger marsupials including possums, bandicoots and quolls (5 g - 5 kg). There will be significant involvement in measuring/identifying vegetation, habitat assessment and data entry. You will need to be prepared for early mornings, long hours in tropical conditions (e.g. long walks carrying traps over rocky terrain, high humidity and temperatures >35oC), sharing cooking duties and living and working in a small team. You will need to have a good work ethic and you must be easy to get along with as field work under arduous conditions can bring out both the best and worst in people! Desirable qualifications include experience with animal handling and ecological methods for undertaking vegetation survey. Accommodation, food and travel associated with field work within Australia will be covered (about half of the time), however the volunteer will provide their own food while based in Kununurra and all their international travel costs. Some accommodation costs may be covered while in Kununurra.

If you would like to apply please email Ian Radford outlining your suitability for the role, relevant experience and two references.

Deadline: April 20th 2013


Expertise

My main research interests are in fire ecology, plant invasion ecology, restoration of degraded landscapes and biological control. A broad perspective on environmental impacts associated with fire and plant invasive species has been gained through work across climatic zones from the dry tropics in northern Australia, through the coastal plains and ranges in NSW, to the cool temperate subalpine environments of New Zealand. Current work involves the impacts of fire regime on tropical biota in the Kimberley region of far north western Australia. My most recent work investigated the relative roles of plant functional traits, competition, disturbance and soil fungal mycorrhizal facilitation of alien plant (Hieracium lepidulum) invasion of south island New Zealand high country environments. Previous studies included the use of fire in restoration of tropical riparian ecosystems invaded by rubbervine (Cryptostegia grandiflora), research into invasion processes associated with Acacia nilotica in the Mitchell grasslands, and use of fire and biocontrol agents for the control of woody weeds in Queensland. I have also conducted studies into comparative ecology and invasive traits among closely related Senecio species, and genetic and taxonomic differentiation in variable species complexes.


Brief CV

Academic Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Agriculture, University of Sydney, 1997
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Sydney, 1991

Research Experience

  • Analysed trends in diverse woody and herbaceous plant communities using species identity, abundance and vegetation structural data (e.g. BOTANAL)
  • Conducted prescribed burning experiments at landscape scales for weed control and ecosystem restoration research
  • Used univariate (ANOVA, regression, non-parametric tests) and multivariate techniques (MANOVA, PCA, CVA, NMS, cluster analyses) for analysis of complex data sets
  • Used comparative growth performance and functional type analysis for identification of plant invasive traits
  • Undertook soil microbial/arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) species manipulations and measured root AMF infection rates
  • Undertook stratified plant demographic and phenological sampling
  • Conducted field based research in remote localities under arduous conditions
  • Used soil analyses (charged resins, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, pH, structural analyses) to quantify plant resources
  • Examined plant breeding systems and hybridisation
  • Used ecological data in population simulations and models
  • Ran isozyme electrophoretic analyses
  • Undertook taxonomic research using morphometric analyses, herbarium survey and electron microscopy

Projects

  • Fire and biodiversity in the Kimberley - BCI project, DEC/Bushfire CRC/CSIRO collaboration
    Use of Landsat technology and biodiversity monitoring (invertebrates, herbaceous and woody plants, soil attributes and function) to determine fire regimes most conducive to conservation aims and arrest of biodiversity declines
  • NHT project, the Kimberley Fire Project, to complement these studies using biodiversity monitoring in conjunction with co-ordinated management approaches to reduce the incidence of large scale severe fires.
  • Grass curing relating to fire danger - Bushfire CRC project
    Linking on the ground measurement of grass curing/moisture with satellite image signatures to allow remote sensing for fire danger indices
  • Proposed studies:-
    PhD supervision of student investigating roles of fire and other processes in maintenance and decline of critical weight range mammals - DEC/UWA/USyd/Bushfire CRC collaboration

Publications (51)

Departmental Publications (51)

Found 51 items

2017

Weier A, Radford IJ, Manson A, Durran LJ, Lawes MJ (2017). Frequent fires reduce the nutritional quality of Sorghum stipoideum seed, a keystone food resource for the Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae). Rangeland Journal 39, pp. 105–112

2016

Hohnen R, Tuft K, Legge S, Hillyer M, Spencer PBS, Radford I et al. (2016). Rainfall and topography predict gene flow among populations of the declining northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus). Conservation Genetics 17, pp. 1213–1228

Hohnen R, Tuft K, Legge S, Walters N, Johanson L, Carver S et al. [Radford I] (2016). The significance of topographic complexity in habitat selection and persistence of a declining marsupial in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Australian Journal of Zoology 64, pp. 198–216

Hohnen R, Tuft K, McGregor HW, Legge S, Radford IJ, Johnson CN (2016). Occupancy of the invasive feral cat varies with habitat complexity. PLoS One 11, pp. 1–8

Radford I, Fairman R (2016). Mammals thriving in the prince of parks. Landscope 31(3), pp. 50–52

Radford I, Fairman R (2016). Surveying Mirima: capturing change. Landscope 31(4), pp. 39–41

Weier A, Radford IJ, Oliveira SLJ, Lawes MJ (2016). Recently but infrequently burnt breeding sites are favoured by threatened Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae). International Journal of Wildland Fire 25, pp. 1281–1290

2015

Clarke PJ, Lawes MJ, Murphy BP, Russell-Smith J, Nano CEM, Bradstock R et al. [Gosper CR, Radford I] (2015). A synthesis of postfire recovery traits of woody plants in Australian ecosystems. Science of the Total Environment 534, pp. 31–42

Hohnen R, Tuft KD, Legge S, Radford IJ, Carver S, Johnson CN (2015). Post-fire habitat use of the golden-backed tree-rat (Mesembriomys macrurus), in the northwest Kimberley, Western Australia. Austral Ecology 40, pp. 941–952

Radford IJ, Fairman R (2015). Fauna and vegetation responses to fire and invasion by toxic cane toads (Rhinella marina) in an obligate seeder-dominated tropical savanna in the Kimberley, northern Australia. Wildlife Research 42, pp. 302–314

Radford IJ, Gibson LA, Corey B, Carnes K, Fairman R (2015). Influence of fire mosaics, habitat characteristics and cattle disturbance on mammals in fire-prone savanna landscapes of the northern Kimberley. PLoS One 10, pp. 1–16

Ziembicki MR, Woinarski JCZ, Webb JK, Vanderduys E, Tuft K, Smith J et al. [Radford IJ] (2015). Stemming the tide: progress towards resolving the causes of decline and implementing management responses for the disappearing mammal fauna of northern Australia. Therya 6, pp. 169–225

2014

Andersen AN, Bocciarelli D, Fairman R, Radford IJ (2014). Conservation status of ants in an iconic region of monsoonal Australia: levels of endemism and responses to fire in the eastern Kimberley. Journal of Insect Conservation 18, pp. 137–146

Corey B, Hatherley E, Moncrieff A, Radford I, Thomson-Dans C (2014). Protecting the nature of the Kimberley. Landscope 30(2), pp. 22–26

Frank A, Johnson C, Legge S, Collis M-A, Fisher A, Lawes M et al. [Radford I] (2014). Repeated evidence: feral cats prohibit establishment of reintroduced small native mammals in northern Australia (ABSTRACT). p. 47

Frank A, Johnson C, Legge S, Collis M-A, Fisher A, Lawes M et al. [Radford I] (2014). Repeated evidence: feral cats prohibit establishment of reintroduced small native mammals in northern Australia (ABSTRACT). In Australian Mammal Society, 60th Scientific Meeting Conference Handbook : 7th-10th July 2014, Melbourne, Melbourne Zoo p. 91

Frank ASK, Johnson CN, Potts JM, Fisher A, Lawes MJ, Woinarski JCZ et al. [Radford IJ] (2014). Experimental evidence that feral cats cause local extirpation of small mammals in Australia's tropical savannas. Journal of Applied Ecology 51, pp. 1486–1493

Hitchcock M, Radford I, Murphy B (2014). Slowing the declines of northern Australia's arboreal mammals (ABSTRACT). In Book of Abstracts: Ecological Society of Australia, 2014 Annual Conference: 28 September-3 October 2014, Alice Springs Convention Centre p. 175

Hitchcock MJ, Radford IJ, Wintle BA, Murphy BP (2014). Arresting the declines of arboreal mammals in the Kimberley (ABSTRACT). In Australian Mammal Society, 60th Scientific Meeting Conference Handbook : 7th-10th July 2014, Melbourne, Melbourne Zoo p. 146

Hitchcock MJ, Radford IJ, Wintle BA, Murphy BP (2014). Arresting the declines of arboreal mammals in the Kimberley (ABSTRACT). p. 67

Hohnen R, Tuft K, Legge S, Johnson C, Radford I (2014). The ecology and habitat selection of the golden-backed tree-rat (Mesembriomys macrurus), in the north Kimberley, Western Australia (ABSTRACT). In Book of Abstracts: Ecological Society of Australia, 2014 Annual Conference: 28 September-3 October 2014, Alice Springs Convention Centre p. 39

Radford I, Dickman C (2014). Mammals of Australia's tropical savannas: a conceptual model of assemblage structure and regulatory factors in the Kimberley region (ABSTRACT). In Book of Abstracts: Ecological Society of Australia, 2014 Annual Conference: 28 September-3 October 2014, Alice Springs Convention Centre p. 37

Radford I, Gibson L, Corey B (2014). Influence of savanna fire regime mosaic in determining threatened mammal assemblage structure in the north Kimberley (ABSTRACT). In Book of Abstracts: Ecological Society of Australia, 2014 Annual Conference: 28 September-3 October 2014, Alice Springs Convention Centre p. 8

Radford IJ, Dickman CR, Start AN, Palmer C, Carnes K, Everitt C, et al. [Fairman R] (2014). Mammals of Australia's tropical savannas: a conceptual model of assemblage structure and regulatory factors in the Kimberley Region. PLoS One 9, pp. 1–13

Tuft K, Legge S, Frank A, Johnson C, Fisher A, Potts J et al. [Radford I] (2014). Experimental evidence for the role of feral cats in northern mammal declines (ABSTRACT). In Book of Abstracts: Ecological Society of Australia, 2014 Annual Conference: 28 September-3 October 2014, Alice Springs Convention Centre p. 28

2013

Radford I (2013). Responses of savanna animals to fire. Poster displayed at Parish's art exhibition at Artopia Gallery, Kununurra July 2013. 1 poster

Radford I, Thomson-Dans, Fairman R, Hatherley E (2013). Kimberley mammals bouncing back. Landscope 28(3), pp. 32–38

Radford IJ (2013). Fluctuating resources, disturbance and plant strategies: diverse mechanisms underlying plant invasions. Journal of Arid Land 5, pp. 284–297

Radford IJ, Andersen AN, Graham G, Trauernicht C (2013). The fire refuge value of patches of a fire-sensitive tree in fire-prone savannas: Callitris intratropica in northern Australia. Biotropica 45, pp. 594–601

2012

Frank A, Johnson C, Legge S, Fisher A, Lawes M, Radford I et al. (2012). The role of feral cats in small mammal declines in northern Australia: experimental evidence. PowerPoint presentation at the Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Dec 3-7, 2012, Melbourne, Australia. 39 p.

Frank A, Johnson C, Woinarski J, Lawes M, Legge S, Fisher A et al. [Radford I] (2012). The role of feral cats in small mammal declines in northern Australia: experimental evidence (ABSTRACT). In Conference Handbook: Ecological Society of Australia, 2012 Annual Conference, Ecology: Fundamental Science of the Biosphere: 3-7 December 2012, the Sebel Albert Park, Melbourne, Victoria p. 143

Radford IJ (2012). Fluctuating resources, disturbance and plant strategies: mechanisms underlying plant invasions. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Invasive Plants and Global Change, June 13-17, 2012, Urumqi, China (ABSTRACT). p. 1

Radford IJ (2012). Threatened mammals become more predatory after small-scale prescribed fires in a high-rainfall rocky savanna. Austral Ecology 37, pp. 926–935

Radford IJ, Andersen AN (2012). Effects of fire on grass-layer savanna macroinvertebrates as key food resources for insectivorous vertebrates in northern Australia. Austral Ecology 37, pp. 733–742

2011

Frank A, Johnson C, Fisher A, Legge S, Lawes M, Collis M-A et al. [Radford I] (2011). Are cats causing northern Australian mammal declines? Tackling the challenge of monitoring a cryptic predator (ABSTRACT). In Ecological Society of Australia, 2011 Annual Conference: Ecology in Changing Landscapes: Conference Handbook, 21-25 November, 2011, Wrest Point, Hobart, Tasmania p. 66

Frank A, Johnson C, Fisher A, Legge S, Lawes M, Collis M-A et al. [Radford I] (2011). Will reptiles experience the same declines as small mammals in the top end? (POSTER ABSTRACT). In Ecological Society of Australia, 2011 Annual Conference: Ecology in Changing Landscapes: Conference Handbook, 21-25 November, 2011, Wrest Point, Hobart, Tasmania p. 255

Radford I, Andersen A (2011). Callitris intratropica as an umbrella for fire-sensitive groups within Australia's tropical savannas (ABSTRACT). In Ecological Society of Australia, 2011 Annual Conference: Ecology in Changing Landscapes: Conference Handbook, 21-25 November, 2011, Wrest Point, Hobart, Tasmania p. 70

Radford IJ, Fairman R, Cook A (2011). Implications of Kimberley fire ecology research for conservation management (ABSTRACT). In Western Australian Bushfire Research Forum 2011, 12 and 13 October 2011: Book of Abstracts p. 21

Woinarski JCZ, Legge S, Fitzsimons JA, Traill BJ, Burbidge AA, Fisher A et al. [McKenzie NL, Radford I] (2011). The disappearing mammal fauna of northern Australia: context, cause, and response. Conservation Letters 4, pp. 192–201

2010

Andersen AN, Lanoue J. Radford I (2010). The ant fauna of the remote Mitchell Falls area of tropical north-western Australia: biogeography, environmental relationships and conservation significance. Journal of Insect Conservation 14, pp. 647–661

Radford IJ (2010). Fire regimes and regional biodiversity declines in north-west Australian tropical savannas? Review of knowledge and recommendations for future research. Conservation Science Western Australia 7, pp. 469–479

Radford IJ, Dickinson KJM, Lord JM (2010). Does disturbance, competition or resource limitation underlie Hieracium lepidulum invasion in New Zealand? Mechanisms of establishment and persistence, and functional differentiation among invasive and native species. Austral Ecology 35, pp. 282–293

2009

Radford IJ, Dickinson KJM, Lord JM (2009). Does the invader Hieracium lepidulum have a comparative growth advantage over co-occurring plants? High leaf area and low metabolic costs as invasive traits. New Zealand Journal of Botany 47, pp. 395–403

Roberts AE, Radford IJ, Orlovich DA (2009). Do alterations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities change interactions between invader Hieracium lepidulum and two co-occurring species? A glasshouse study. Australasian Mycologist 28, pp. 29–35

2008

Radford I, Fairman R (2008). Preliminary report: fire responses of threatened mammals, and other taxa, in the Mitchell River area, north Kimberley, WA. Department of Environment and Conservation, Kununurra. 15 p.

Radford I, White K (2008). Fire in the Kimberley: natural phenomenon or natural disaster?. Landscope 23(3), pp. 22–28

Radford IJ, Grice AC, Abbott BN, Nicholas DM, Whiteman L (2008). Impacts of changed fire regimes on tropical riparian vegetation invaded by an exotic vine. Austral Ecology 33, pp. 151–167

2007

Prentis PJ, White EM, Radford IJ, Lowe AJ, Clarke AR (2007). Can hybridization cause local extinction: a case for demographic swamping of the Australian native Senecio pinnatifolius by the invasive Senecio madagascariensis?. New Phytologist 176, pp. 902–912

Radford IJ, Dickinson KJM, Lord JM (2007). Functional and performance comparisons of invasive Hieracium lepidulum and co-occurring species in New Zealand. Austral Ecology 32, pp. 338–354

2006

Radford IJ, Dickinson KJM, Lord JM (2006). Nutrient stress and performance of invasive Hieracium lepidulum and co-occurring species in New Zealand. Basic and Applied Ecology 7, pp. 320–333

2005

Downs TM, Radford IJ (2005). Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonisation of Hieracium lepidulum roots in experimental and field soil inoculated media. New Zealand Journal of Botany 43, pp. 843–850